Not Just the ACBL Story – But HISTORY

True accounts of events and people who shaped the ACBL

ACBL Bridge Beat #74: 1968 Finals Day Two

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On the second day, the standings took on a new complexion as Eisenberg-Goldman crushed Hamman-Kantar 70 ½ – 13 ½ and Rapée-Lazard narrowly defeated Caravelli-Rosenberg 45-39. Rubin-Westheimer took Wolff-Jacoby 63-21 and Becker-Hayden edged out Kaplan-Kay 50-34. The standings bunch with Rapée-Lazard 229; Hamman-Kantar 227 ½ ; Eisenberg-Goldman 217 ½ ; Rubin-Westheimer 199.

Slams proved troublesome in the evening. There were three slams in the evening’s 28-boards – two better than odds-on and one 50-50 at best. Only one pair got to either of the two good slams and only one pair stayed out of the doubtful slam, picking up a bushel when a crucial finesse lost. Here are the deals:

Deal 1

Dlr: East ♠ A J 10 8
Vul: N-S A K
A K Q 8
♣ 7 6 2
♠ K 7 5 4 2 ♠ 6 3
7 4 Q 10 9 5 3 2
10 9 3 J 7 6 5
♣ 5 4 3 ♣ A
♠ Q 9
J 8 6
4 2
♣ K Q J 10 9 8

At four tables, the bidding started with three passes and North opened 2NT. South tamely raised to 3NT and 12 tricks were made with a spade finesse. At one table clubs was the final contract, but only five of them:

West North East South
(Kay) (Morse) (Kaplan) (Feldesman)
2 Pass
3 Dbl Pass 4♣
Pass 5♣ All Pass

In view of North’s vulnerable takeout double at the three level, South might have responded five clubs and North would certainly have bid six. This slam was iron-clad.

Only a spade lead presents any problem and declarer can either try the spade finesse or play three rounds of diamonds, discarding a spade from his own hand.

Deal 2

Dlr: East ♠ A 10
Vul: None 10 8 2
A J 8 5 2
♣ A 8 6
♠ J 9 4 2 ♠ K 6 3
Q 6 5 4 3
9 4 10 7 3
♣ J 9 7 5 4 3 2 ♣ K Q
♠ Q 8 7 5
A K J 9 7
K Q 6
♣ 10

The usual auction was:

West North East South
Pass 1
Pass 2 Pass 3
Pass 3 Pass 4
All Pass

North was not too enterprising. With three aces, either a change of suit before giving heart support or a later move might get to slam. The diamond slam is the better contract.

At the only table where the slam was bid, a weak jump overcall helped.

West North East South
(Kaplan) (Feldesman) (Kay) (Morse)
Pass 1
3♣ 3 4♣ 4
Pass 4NT Pass 5
Pass 6 Pass Pass
Dbl All Pass

Kay led a heart as directed by the double. Kaplan got his ruff, but that was the only trick for the defense.

Deal 3

Dlr: East ♠ 9 7 2
Vul: None A J 10 3 2
4
♣ A J 10 5
♠ 4 3 ♠ 10 8
8 7 5 K 6
A 8 7 Q 10 9 5 3 2
♣ Q 9 8 7 3 ♣ K 4 2
♠ A K Q J 6 5
Q 9 4
K J 6
♣ 6

The usual auction was:

West North East South
Pass 1♠
Pass 2 Pass 3♠
Pass 4♣ Pass 4
Pass 4NT Pass 5
Pass 6♠ All Pass

Though the slam depended only on the heart finesse, the bidding might had gone the same way had North had the eight of hearts instead of the 10, and then there would have been very little play. North seems to have done enough with his 4♣ bid. A simple preference to 4♠, leaving further action to South seems wise.

Rapée-Lazard were the only pair to stay out of the slam, on this auction:

West North East South
(Lazard) (Rapée)
Pass 1♠
Pass 2 Pass 3♠
Pass 4♣ Dbl Rdbl
Pass 4♠ All Pass

South’s redouble showed second-round control in clubs. Rapée decided Lazard would not have bid only 4♠ with the ace-king of hearts and the ace of clubs and a singleton diamond. Missing at least two key cards, he knew the slam was on a finesse at best.

Standings after four rounds: Eisenberg-Goldman 296 ½ ; Rapée-Lazard 292; Hamman-Kantar 290 ½ ; Becker-Hayden 210.

Goldman-Eisenberg

Goldman-Eisenberg

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Written by acbl

June 29, 2012 at 11:26 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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